A family member visits, anxiety ensues

My dad is here with me in Kathmandu. It feels strange, to have him out here. He’s no stranger to travel, mind. My parents routinely visit my nieces in Spain, or have a fun jaunt in other parts of Europe. But this is Asia. More than Asia, it’s Kathmandu.

Unlike my brother, I’ve grown accustomed to not hosting family out here. I always imagined that to them, Asia seemed like the edge of the world, a no-man’s land. Europe is familiar and friendly; people look the same as we do, but with less body fat. Asia on the other hand, is exotic. 

Indeed, Asia is exotic, but you get over it after a few weeks. End of the day, it’s just another contract, whether I’m in Beijing or Borneo, Qatar or Kathmandu. By the end of my first month in any host city, I’ve learned how to order off menus, get around in taxis, and haggle where needed. I know the location of the local grocery store and the local pub. My flat is set up, a la Fortress of Solitude, and I spend the remainder of my contract descending further and further into the depths of my host culture.

A visitor from home then can be a little unnerving. Even if you’ve never lived abroad, I’m sure you can relate. Ever had one of those moments, when you’re busy being you? Say you’re singing Mariah Carey in the shower, top volume. Your significant other gets home early from work, hears you singing. You feel a little embarrassed but everyone has a good laugh. Now multiply that times several days.

In the days before my dad’s visit, I compiled a mental inventory of what could get weird for him. He hasn’t been to Asia since the 70’s, and he’s never really seen a developing country before. So let’s start there.

Garbage everywhere. I mean everywhere. It’s on the streets, the pedestrian lanes, the rivers… everywhere. Kathmandu is a giant interactive landfill.

The air is chewable. Heavy particulate matter, such as the dust that’s perpetually kicked up from unpaved roads and endless construction projects, combines with light particulate matter, like the emissions from unregulated brick foundries and diesel engines, to create a potent, dull grey cocktail of low air quality. Add a dash of trash fires for extra dioxins, and you’ve got the Kathmandu Valley Swizzle.

These drivers. In a city with no traffic lights, stop signs, or lines in the roads (which may or may not be paved), drivers definitely do their own thing. And the horns the horns always the horns.

Then there’s me. My free time is usually spent in one of the garden bars around town, or in front of my buddy’s bodega, drinking lousy beer and socializing. Lots of dick jokes. To an outsider, this might look depressing. To a family member, it might look concerning.

Fortunately, there was no judgement when my dad came to visit. Indeed, he was more than happy to join in with the loitering and revelry. However, he’s said more than a few times now, in observing the garbage, the air, and the devil-may-care drivers, “You need to get the hell out of this town, man.”

 

 

One thought on “A family member visits, anxiety ensues

  1. Like where you are going, darling. Not just in your writing, but in your head…. it sounds like you are ripe for revival, and you are taking control of your journey xoxo Mom

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